Dr. Percy’s proposal on national security is dangerous (Part II)

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Tuesday, October 30, 2012

We acknowledge the fact that as a human institution, the national security apparatus is not immune to manipulation. But why should we single out the President when there are various mechanisms of control? The security apparatus can be manipulated by not only the President but their own commanders as well.

The real issue to fear is any friction between the President and upper echelons of the security services, especially in a situation where any of them may flagrantly disobey the President’s order. It happens in other countries and causes much trouble.

In our case, we haven’t had anything of the sort. It doesn’t mean that it can’t happen, but it hasn’t happened so far nor is there any inkling to alert us to its happening soon or later. Continue reading

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Dr. Percy’s proposal on national security is dangerous (Part I)

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Tuesday, October 30, 2012

The proposal by Dr. David Percy, a leading member of the National Reform Party (NRP), that all Presidents refrain from directing national security during every election is unacceptable. In sum, it is not only absurd but dangerous and inadmissible for several reasons.

What is the rationale behind Dr. Percy’s proposal? He “believes such a move will be a major step in addressing transparency among security officials and insecurity of ballot boxes during elections” (Ghanaweb, October 28, 2012).

Transparency in national security matters and security for ballot boxes? Who says there is anything opaque going on that is a problem for a non-security expert like Dr. Percy to diagnose and prescribe this kind of solution on? I don’t see it. Continue reading

Will Akufo-Addo listen to Dr. Mensa Otabil?

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Monday, October 29, 2012

The General Overseer of the International Central Gospel Church, Dr. Mensa Otabil, deserves support in his singular effort to disabuse the minds of Ghanaians on a major political item. He has inserted himself into the controversy raised by the NPP’s Akufo-Addo and his promise of a fee-free SHS education.

Dr. Otabil has discounted such a promise and warned Ghanaians to be wary because there is no “free education” anywhere in the world. I wholeheartedly support him. He has spoken for many of us and given us a good cause to sustain our criticism of that promise. Continue reading

This politics of killing and maiming won’t build Ghana…

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Monday, October 29, 2012

As we prepare for the December elections, we mustn’t lose sight of the fact that intra-party or inter-party rivalry won’t be the solution to the country’s problems. The Commission on Human Rights and Administrative Justice (CHRAJ) has already sounded the alarm bell to suggest that tension is rising in the country, which is disturbing.

All over the radio stations and public forums, hot exchanges between political rivals dominate interactions. The use of foul language is exacerbated by physical assaults on political opponents. Some may claim that they are fighting their parties’ cause by so doing; others may claim that silencing dissension will pave the way for them to win voter confidence to return to power or cling on to it. I mock them!! Continue reading

When Ghanaians call themselves magicians…

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Sunday, October 28, 2012

The zeal with which Ghanaians participate in the US Diversity Visa Lottery and the length to which some go to desert the country is amazing.

Some have fallen prey to visa racketeers and been duped of huge sums of money meant for visa arrangements yet remain undaunted in their determination to leave the country. Others have managed to pay their way out of the country only to regret later. They realize rather too late that they would have been better off staying in the frying pan than jumping right into the fire below.

No matter what it is, there is something to ponder. Is it not ironical or paradoxical that while Ghanaians are doing all they can to move out of the country in search of greener pastures elsewhere, other nationals are rushing into the country to set themselves up? Continue reading

Free senior high school: Too many red flags!

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Saturday, October 27, 2012

Some commentators responding to my opinion piece challenging the feasibility of Akufo-Addo’s promise on free Senior High School education have rightly explained the benefits of education and why they think that promise is laudable. I don’t doubt the fact that formal education is a necessity.

To clarify my stance, let me say that I value education in all its forms and stages (from the informal to the formal one, low-level or higher) but not what Akufo-Addo is making noise about. I am guided in principle by some concerns, which Akufo-Addo’s pronouncements haven’t allayed so far:

  • What made him think that the country’s problems are caused by lack of free education at the senior secondary school level to produce the expertise needed for national development? Continue reading

Kufuor is hurting, not helping Akufo-Addo

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Friday, October 26, 2012

I have said it several times already that former President Kufuor will do himself a world of good if he zips his mouth instead of saying what hurts his image and detracts from the NPP’s political fortunes. He won’t listen and is now unwittingly eroding much of what Akufo-Addo needs to make any headway at the polls.

Kufuor is a problem for several reasons, especially the negative impact that his tenure had on the NPP’s public image, which was a major factor in the 2008 elections. Continue reading